Thursday, December 16, 2010

Don't be deceived by the 'Goose 29er

I think it's a good beginner bike,

with the proper upgrades it's a great trail bike..I've rode mine plenty hard..

Anon 9:07 pm

Disclaimer:  Originally this post was a review of the Mongoose Deception but how can it be called a review if I have never owned one or even ridden one? As one commenter recently pointed out, you were right and I am sorry I deleted your comment.  I think what I was trying to do with my original post was to show my readers that 29ers have finally hit the mass produced, low quality bike manufacturing line sold by the big box retailer.  Posted here are merely my observations of a bike that I saw in a bike rack at the office one day and it surprised me to see that 29ers finally (in 2009) hit that point.  You can also now get a Fixie at the big box retailer but that is a different story.   

Read the comments to this post if you want a real review of the bike.
If you have one, share your experiences!

Mongoose was a great brand of bikes but in today's market, the decision to build and sell cheap quality bikes in order to diversify your product line in order to meet all market demands at the same time sacrificing quality and craftsmanship is a shame.  If that makes me a Bike Snob, so be it, but one has to stick to his principles and my feeling is that your reputation as a bike manufacturer is relies solely on the quality of your product.  No amount of Red Bull Sensationalism and an experienced rider, in my opinion, is going to help sell an inferior product.

Also, just so that you know, I have never purchased one of these bikes, nor do I plan to.  This post is merely based on observations and correlation of facts accessible through the interwebs.  Should I ever come into possession of one of these bikes, I would thoroughly and rigorously test it on rail trails, bikes paths and commutes.  For the individual wanting to get into the sport as cheaply as possible, and drink the 29er kool aid along the way,  I would not recommend this bike.  Buyer Beware!

Take my advice, spend a little extra money at a local bike shop and start building that relationship with them so that over time you get outstanding service and a shop that is going to take care of you.  The big box retailer will refund your money or, from what I hear, give you another bike.  Supporting your local bike shop (LBS) supports your local economy.


Original Post:

It appears the 29er has finally hit critical mass in popularity if it's now being sold in a big box store as seen by this very low end entrant to the 29er family, the Mongoose Deception 29.  The naming of this bike is cliche because looks can be deceptive.


Basically, for a fraction of the price you can get all the features of a real 29er!  That's great isn't?  Or is it?  Reviews that I have read about the bike, range from great to as soon as I started riding this POS it broke. Of course it would be a great bike for commuting or riding bike paths or rail trails but many folks on that review site mention how they have had to replace parts.  Even if you purchased the cheapest bike at an LBS you would not be replacing parts right out of the gate, in my experience of buying bikes from bike shops.

There is an interesting thread on MTBR that might be worth reading, if you haven't already.  While the 29er riders at MTBR may sound elitist they do know their stuff.  All you folks thinking you are getting over on those that spend more money on their bikes, you may be saving some money in the near term but later down the road, if you ride this thing on trails, you will be wishing you went to your Local Bike Shop and spent a little more money.  I am always looking for a bargain, but buyer beware, don't be deceived by the Mongoose Deception!

Men's Health mentioned an earlier version of the Mongoose 29er, the Impasse (who comes up with these names?) that states:
It’s got no suspension, and the components won’t last long. (Grip shifters? Really?) But the Mongoose Impasse is a blast on rolling trail thanks to those meaty 29-inch wheels. Oh, yeah — and it only costs $199. Truth is, a worthwhile mountain bike with any suspension starts at $2,000, so if you’re just looking to dip your toes in the sport or try the 29er experience on the cheap, you can’t go wrong with the Walmart special.
UPDATE: The Impasse has since sold out at Walmart, and has been replaced by the Mongoose Deception, also a $199 29er.
While I would disagree with the statement that any worthwhile mountain bike with suspension starts at $2,000 because I think it's more like $1000, Men's Health is saying that if you really want a good mountain bike, you will need to drop anywhere from $2,000 to $6,000, but if you want a sniff, head on down to the nearest big box store and get yourself a 'Goose!  Ahonk!


Actually, the name is fitting, just like the Impasse, any one purchasing this bike is automatically being deceived that they are getting 29er, especially if you read the description by a famous big box store not known for selling quality biking merchandise:

The Men's All-Terrain Bike Mongoose Deception model features 29" wheels that roll over rocks, stumps and roots easier than standard-size wheels. That means more fun and less wipeouts. With details you expect such as disc brakes, front suspension and a tough, alloy frame, the Men's All-Terrain Bike by Mongoose delivers a great riding experience, for less.
More fun and less wipeouts?  Is that meant to mean because you roll over things better with the bigger wheels you are less likely go OTB?  Regardless of the wheel size, it's the skills not the bike that will keep you safe.

Most of the bikes made to look like they are made for riding on trails that I have seen sold at these stores all have disclaimers warning the new owner that the bike is not made for off road use.  And then there is the fact that they are calling it an All-Terrain Bike and not a Mountain Bike.  Is this the distinction for a bike made to be ridden on single track (e.g. Mountain Bike) and one that you can ride on trails as long as they are not really technical and challenging?  Call it what you will but anyone walking into the store will think they are buying a Mountain Bike.


The other funny thing is that there is no mention of this bike on the Mongoose Website.  I couldn't find it listed in Canada either but the frame is very similar to the 2010 Tyax Sport.  Is there a website for sub par bikes of questionable manufacture?  Or does the company not want to be associated with this bike, because it's not a Mountain Bike in the purest sense of the word, but they still tout their commuter bikes on the website.  No, I think the answer is, and I forget where I heard this, but bikes of this quality are made exclusively to be sold in the low end market for the big box stores.  Similarly, another brand that recently went under, Iron Horse, I have heard will be back exclusively at Costco.  


Nice welds, not!


The parts spec is especially deceptive:

Men's All-Terrain Bike Mongoose Deception Model (29"):

Riding Style: All-terrain
Frame Material: Alloy 6061
Handlebars: Alloy Riser bars
Gearing: 21 speed
Seat: MTB saddle
Brakes: Lee Chi DSK-400 disc brakes
Brake Levers: Lee Chi levers with alloy lever
Wheels/Tires: 29" x 2.1" tires with 36H wheels
Rims: alloy
Pedals: alloy VP pedal
Assembly required
Weight: 38 lbs.




The weight of this bike is unbelievable!  Almost 40 lbs.  While 6061 aluminum is cheaper than 7005 it is a bit softer, and that's a plus. Still, Men's Health doesn't feel that the stock componentry would last very long.


I have never seen a stem reversed on a mountain bike before, granted the rider of this bike doesn't strike me as someone who is planning to ride it off road.  This is being used as a commuter.


There is a good thread on MTBR written by a new owner of one of these bikes and how the fork already failed him.  This bike doesn't sound like it could handle being ridden too hard but if you were looking for something for rail trails, dirt roads, or maybe even fire roads and didn't have a lot of coin, this might do the trick.  I would not recommend this bike if you were looking for a cheaper entry point into the 29er riding world because by the time you finish upgrading all the parts that would be broken you might as well buy something a little better and not from big box shop.

60 comments:

buck said...

The least expensive squishy bike you can find with a FOX fork is the ideal starting price.

A. K. E. said...

38 lbs. is shipping weight including box.

Remove kickstand and reflectors and you have a 30 lb. bike.

I own this bike as do a handful of my adult friends. It rocks; we love it.

It is well worth over $200.

A. K. E. said...

: )

Mark said...

@AKE, you need to remove or swap out a lot more to get this bike down to 30 lbs. But, if you are looking for a bike to ride with the kids on rail trails and the like, this bike is perfect. Just don't delude yourself that you are buying a real mountain bike, because you are not.

Shawn H said...

Would I have any problems putting a kid seat on the back of this bike?

Mark said...

@Shawn H, yes I think you would have problem because the disc brake would prevent you from mounting the rack needed to hold the kid seat, so you would have mount to the seat stays. The only rack that I know of that lets you do that is the one from Topeak, however, you still need the hard points near the seat tube that I don't see on this bike.

CraigJ said...

I bought a Deception in November of 2010 and have ridden it at least 3 times a week since (rain or snow... mostly snow). With all the extras off (kickstand, etc) it weighs about 33lbs which puts it in the average weight for a low-end 29er. You obviously took the "shipping weight" which seems a bit unfair to me. The bike has stood up well with no problems once I swapped out the open BB for a sealed unit and changed the pedals. The bike is totally upgradeable with stock components (unlike some big box bikes) and owners have put Dart3 forks on, Alivio shifters, derailleurs and cranks, and so forth. The bike is a good value and even if you upgrade it you'll still be into it cheaper than a new "name" bike.

Mark said...

@CraigJ That's great! Just remember when that frame cracks because hucked that one footer that you bought a $200 bike "all-terrain-bike" which doesn't really equate to a "mountain bike." But don't get me wrong, I wouldn't mind one for the riding that I do with my kids on rail trails and going camping. It's perfect for that.

Dez said...

Wow i see so much trash being talked about this bike.But i bought one and changed some things out and have rode very hard and done some very tough trails and it has not fallen apart but i guess its just a dream cause you all say it junk so because you said it then it must be true.....so ill keep riding it and keep doing upgrades even though its gonna crack and fall apart thanks

Mark said...

@Dez, OK, so you spend 2 hundy on the bike and you end up putting another 2 or 3 hundy into it. I don't think you are doing the work yourself so your bike is at the shop for a what, a week? That means you are not riding it. Hey, if that works for you, great! What you bought is not a mountain bike but if you ride it like one it's at your risk.

Dez said...

@mark yes i am doing the work myself and i have less than and any entry lvl you buy you have to do upgrades so i dont get your point there and even the entry lvl Diamond Back has the warning sticker on the fork saying it is not for off road use so does that make it less than a MTB or since it was not bought at a Big Box Store that makes it better ??? i guess to each his own i have the same lvl componets on mine as alot of the trek's that i have seen so you say it is not a MTB but i say diffrent and since when is it more important what you spend on a bike than how much fun you are having getting out of the house and Riding yes i admitt the way the Deception is set up from the store no it will not stand up to huge trails but its just like anything eles the better the upgrades the better the ride...But no mine does not spend weeks in a bike shop everything that has been done i have done myself this is not my first bike i went from a gary fisher 26er to this bike and i am having a blast with this bike (At my Own Risk)....

Anonymous said...

Is it just me or does this Mark guy seem like a hater. While its great to leave helpful comments for readers its not okay to just keep bashing every comment from other people. You must have spent $2000 on a 29er so your hating that people can spend less and still have an ok experience. Obviously if they are buying it at Wal-mart I am certain they dont think its going to be serious racing material.

Mark said...

@Dez Good to hear that you are doing all your own work - you save a lot of $$$ that way. My first bike was a Trek (not a 29er) and not really a mountain bike per se, similar to the 'Goose. After destroying it a few times riding single track I knew it was time to get a real mountain bike.

@Anon, I am not a hater, more of realist. Don't buy the 'Goose thinking you are getting a mountain bike, because you are not. If you have read my blog you will find that have owned two 'Goose and loved them but I also understood their purposes. While they were both touted as mountain bikes they were clearly not made to handle the type of riding that I regularly do.

Funny, I have never spent $2K on a 29er. I think the Qball was the only complete bike I ever bought and that was $1200 but my two other bikes I bought the frames and built them up myself.

Let's hope someone buying a Walgoose isn't going to try to race on it but keep in mind not everyone is as well read and then they see a bike at that price and think they are getting a mountain bike, they are not.

Ben said...

Mark, aside from the Impasse, I will say that your current masthead photo is quite nice!

Phillip said...

I own the bike and do harder rides on it, some of the more technical stuff such as rock gardens and creek crossings. I haven't had a whole lot of issues with this bike other than the rear hub busted while doing a hill climb and the seatpost broke. The rims are single wall which kind of suck but other than that it seems to be a solid bike and for the price I paid honestly I would recommend it to anyone looking to have a decent starter bike who wants to buy a better one later.

Legion said...

I am not a pro rider or anything I freestyled as a kid and that is not good to do on this bike I was playing around and doing bunny hops and I did a tailkick to "tap" a friend and my rear wheel mangled itself uggh so my daily commuter bike is down so any advice on a good set of wheels to put on it that don't get FUBAR'd so easy possibly still light, cheap(this is a resession) and tougher?

Mark said...

@Legion, check out Wheel and Sprocket or any online retailer for that matter. You probably only want to spend around $100.

Anonymous said...

I like this bike. I ride it pretty aggressively on rough terrain trails. The only thing I am not really a fan of is the grip shifters, but for 40 buck I am switching them out. I'm 6'5" and need a big bike. For those that don't have 1-6,000 laying around, it is a good fit. No problems. And, I like the brakes, they work great! And the author was correct, many big name companies contract for "lower quality bikes" to be sold at big box stores. This can also be seen with the Genesis 29er. Genesis makes high end bikes, but has a cheaper model they sell at these stores. All companies do this: Car companies have low end cars and high end cars so they can capture a broader market. Side note: they offer a warranty for $9.

Anonymous said...

i too have this bike, its not a bad bike, but its my starter. i am already raplacing the front rim and possibly the forks. but it took alot of punishing drops and hills before i broke anything. i rode it in moab Utah on both easy and expert traisl. i then took it home to logan and have rode all over the mountains in northern utah and southern idaho. and i like this bike so far. i know ill be replacing parts, but its an awesome starter bike id reccomend it to anybody.

Anonymous said...

Sounds like who ever wrote this review is pissed off that he spent $5000.00 on a bike and he could have got one for $200.00 that is just as good.

Anonymous said...

I just got this bike and I popped it's cherry on a really hard trail this weekend... I felt that for $200 bucks it would not hurt as much as if I had spent $1500 if I killed it on the trail. To tell you the truth I did a lot of research on 29" type bikes and a Giant mid level is priced at $550-800, and the only REAL differance was a rock shock fork and sram rappid fire shifters... both can be baught on ebay for less than $150 and can be done by non experts in your home with few tools; to get to the point my riding buddies that have trek, Scotts and specialized bikes were impressed at the major ass whipping I gave this bike over the weekend and how it performed. I even ran it off a 6' drop just for giggles and it took it like a champ lol! YES I AGREE that some parts are cheap, but not garbage! I love this bike knowing what abuse it took from me as it is a great platform to upgrade and to enjoy in my opinion. I'm in FL look up on you tube Ameila Airheart Park Hialeah FL and Marcom Park FL and come down and have some fun. I'll let you beat up on my Big box garbage bike, but I have to warn you that you might like it.

Anonymous said...

Took this bike out to Santos trials and expected to break it and return it. Hmmm so much for that ideal, rode the crap out of it, got great air in Vortex, took it on all kinds of Red trails, rode it down "Magic Mountian" and with the exception of the upgrade on the seat the bike was surpizing in a good way. Rode with friends who knew I was out to break this thing and we were all very surprized. To say this bike is only for the light trails is not true. Front shock was actually working pretty good for what appears to be a cheap shock. No not competition by any means but for a cheap bike very surprising. Worked as good as my Trek 4300 suspension. Brakes are very strong, shifters work as designed, but I hated the twist shift. A set of rapid fires would help alot. Might be just personal preference. I really do not think you can go wrong for the money. Funny thing is I was going to return it after beating on it. Still own it, and have riden it several times since. Thinking about upgrading just to an Altus on the rear, maybe even go to 27 speed but gearing is not bad, and front fork and keeping it. Had no problems with rims, which I expected, but would replace them before anymore high flying action just for safely sake. Haven't yet but I trued and tightened spokes before first ride, which if you are going to beat on any bike this should be done, remember these are assembled by Wally world people, CHECK everything. People give me crap about it, oh well life goes on, I am not identified by how much I spent on a bike in the first place. Would recommend this not only to the first time rider but actually to the intermediate rider who wants that oh so cushy 29 ride.

Anonymous said...

I got mine at a 40% discount, apparently someone rode it and returned it, after gradual upgrades, i'll still be ahead, just getting started, and this will do till im ready for a "mountain bike" if i kill this bike, im ok with it, everyone knows you get what you pay for at wal mart, so be it, im happy with it, thats what matters to me.

Anonymous said...

Have to say - I was a fan for a few months, but a 3" curb just took out the back tire rim.... and I ended up walking the thing home. Yes, the tires had JUST been checked and filled to the appropriate level. I liked the bike in general - but this is ridiculous :)

Nolan said...

Pretty good upgrade from my $79 full squish 26er walmart bike.

I am replacing the fork with a steel ridged (I must have twisted the left post somehow).

After approx. 400 miles the bottom bracket is starting the click from time to time and I need to adjust the rear shifter/cable.

Anonymous said...

No kidding, people who own the bike (and didn't buy a better) "defend" it like their personal property. Unreal, like always.

I like the bike from appearance and wheel size, test drove it, and now don't like it.

Mark said...

@Anon 4:11 pm No kidding. I found that someone who read this post used it to make an example on some Big Box Bike fan forum (there's a forum for everything). And I felt that the poster was misinterpreting my position. I admit, this post is critical/skeptical and my intention was to warn people not to think they were getting a great product for pennies compared to what you would purchase elsewhere but those guys on that forum didn't want to hear it and banned me.

The funny thing is that they had it set in their minds that I was some elitist 29er rider from MTBR, which I am not, and that I was abusing their sensibilities, which I wasn't but they didn't want to hear it.

I will say it again, this 'Goose isn't going to lay any golden eggs for you if you ride it like a real mountain bike because after awhile you will be shelling out the dough (golden eggs) to replace parts.

Legion said...

Thanks Mark =]

Anonymous said...

I am 46 years old and have ridden everything from huffy to cannondale. It does not matter what you ride or he trails you ride, I do it for the love of the sport. So trash the low end big boxers all you want . Just remember all bikes are not equal it's. The ride that counts.

Clayton said...

my crank came off on the right side so i tried screwing the bolt back in and it just keeps coming unscrewed. am i missing a part because all i have for it is the bolt, is there a piece missing from it?

Mark said...

Clayton, your crank bolt must be stripped. All you have to do is replace the bottom bracket. Of course, that means you have to buy another part for the bike and unless you know what you are doing you will need to have that done at a bike shop.

Anonymous said...

wow who spends this much time bashing a low end specific bike as if it were claimed to be performance race bike? Whata joke! I just got one of these for my 60+ year old dad so he can cruze some flowy trails in Dupont state forest and Pisgah national forest.

Clayton said...

thanks mark

Anonymous said...

This bike is great,I enjoy more using this bike than my Scott scale 40, ok p

Anonymous said...

I really put this bike to the test here in Puerto Rico. I put Fox Fork, XT Transmision, and run and rumble

Mark said...

@Anon 12:42 but that's just it. If it quacks like a duck, it's still a duck. Upgrades on a shitty bike just means it's a shitty bike with upgrades!

Anonymous said...

Just bought one for 219. I simply couldn't afford anything more expensive. We'll see if it holds up. Last time I had a new MB it was a $1000 Fuji that broke every time I rode it. I then dicovered that breakage on offroad rides was not covered under warranty and I was out $100-$200 each time.

If this bike breaks at least it's not really any more expensive than just the repairs on my last bike.

Anonymous said...

I ride as a commute to work and never change the gears. I just bought one. I rarely go off road. The ride is smooth. Please tell me this bike will last me. I got it for my b-day.

Mark Lurie said...

@Anon 12:36 you could be a good test case. Report back in every month or so and give me updates. Even better, email me a write up with some pictures and I will post them here with a link for all those that read this post to follow your progress.

This bike, with some skinnier tires, would make an AWESOME commuter. I wouldn't say no to one.

Anonymous said...

Excelent frame,I put a few part from my other Bike,cranks KCNC,X9,carbon handle bar,DT SWISS RIMS,Race King tires,Selle seat,.My other bike brake the frame two times in one year,it cost me 3K,when the new frame arrive,Im selling it.The Impasse is holding all the abuse I put on ,7 month with no cracks.EXCELENT ,STRONG FRAME.:) :) :) :)

Anonymous said...

Maybe for some people that are hardcore into trail riding this isnt the best bike. For us majority of bike riders out there I see this as a great bike!

Anonymous said...

I've had mine for 2 years now....
Lot's of singletrack riding.
The frame is decent,all the other parts are complete rubbish...
I have yet to hear of anyones frame breaking..

I have made mine SS/Rigid..
Only thing left stock is seatpost
and stem....


I think it's a good beginner bike,
with the proper upgrades it's a great trail bike..I've rode mine plenty hard..

Anonymous said...

I've had mine for 2 years now....
Lot's of singletrack riding.
The frame is decent,all the other parts are complete rubbish...
I have yet to hear of anyones frame breaking..

I have made mine SS/Rigid..
Only thing left stock is seatpost
and stem....


I think it's a good beginner bike,
with the proper upgrades it's a great trail bike..I've rode mine plenty hard..

D3ADLYSTRIK3 said...

i have had this bike for about six months i have had to replace the rear axle the chain botgh derailuers a shifter and truing the rim because of cheap aluminum

Jason said...

What are the specs on the rims, crank set, derailers and shift levers so I can replace mine. Also is there a hydraulic disc brake setup to convert my walgoose 29er?

Mark Lurie said...

I wouldn't recommend blinging the bike out but checkout eBay, Amazon, or anyone of the numerous online bike part retailers for parts.

Anonymous said...

I shaved another half pound off by replacing the falcon freewheel with a real shimano one. i like the bike ok but i use it for a road bike cause where i live theres no bike paths and the road shoulders suck. got sick of fixing rims on my canondale road bike. replaced a few parts, tires, grips and freewheel and chain. keep in mind a cone and cup bottom bracket needs adjustment from time to time. buy the tools and learn to do it yourself or upgrade to a sealed one. heck all bikes ya buy are just a frame with 4 or 5 other companies parts. heck trek is made in asia now. as for bike shops the ones in my area are kind of jerks so i learned to do it all myself. if they dont ease up on their markup sites like bikes direct are gonna kill the LBS. maybe thats why theirs a flame war every time a cheapo bike gets some attention.

Anonymous said...

I got this bike used and it rides like shit. Cheap bikes might ride ok at first, but then stuff starts to wear out. The fork is the biggest issue. It sticks when going up and down and doesn't move on even medium size bumps. It is not smooth at all and even after cleaning it and putting grease in it, it didn't get much better. The guides are so worn that they kink and catch when going up and down, and nothing can fix that but a new fork. The brakes are very weak, but that is an easy fix. Just take them apart and sand down the pads and rotors a little and they are good as new. The deraileur is very out of tune and wiggles from side to side a lot, very sloppy. The shifters are junk now, too. Wheels are in good shape. Chain is rusted, I think I will just clean and lube it. I really wish I had my old gt timberline back, it was stolen. A light chrome moly steel frame, much lighter than this bike and 10x stronger. Shimano xt hubs and very strong double wall rims. It had rim brakes but back when it was made, that was all they had so they made them good. Great breaks. The rear derailleur was shimano, but that don't say much, all I know was they were high end and when I was in a big crash, it got badly bent. Turns out, the frame was bent where the derailleur bolts on! Just bent the mount back with a huge pair of pliers, the derailleur barely had a scratch. You can't bend aluminum frames, if they are bent in a crash nothing you can do to fix it. Also had a Flex Stem front suspension, which works great. The bike was indestructible. You get what you pay for, bottom line. Cheap frames weigh more and might not break but they flex. Cheap wheels bend. Cheap shifters loose accuracy and you get sloppy shifting after a while. Same for derailleurs. It comes down to the rider, if you are a good rider, you can tell the difference and you need a good bike. Cheapos are good if you want a bike that will get you from point a to b and ride ok for a while. It will wear out prematurely and then need lots of parts to ride well again. Once again, you get what you pay for.

Unknown said...

After going over every nut and bolt and adjusting everything, I got my money's worth after a few trail rides. BTW, I'm 66 and this Deception is way better than I am.

Anonymous said...

I bought this bike about a year ago when I decided to fall off my Haro and watch it fall down a rocky face to its untimely demise. It was cheaper to buy this bike than to replace components on my broken one. I was was incredibly skeptical, and a little embarrassed to take it down to the local trails. My first day out on it, I honestly loved it from the get go. I started tailoring it bit by bit, and with a lower rise on the bars, some specialized tubes, and lighter weight BREV crank arms, It was all I could need. This Goose 29er eats the local trails alive. Granted they aren't extremely technical, and they aren't your weekend long rides, but they can be rough and fast. I have literally not had a single thing go wrong with the bike since I have had it. If anyone is looking for an additional challenge, do what i did. Swap out the rear gearing for a single speed 14t sprocket, and the front gearing for a single speed 110/130 43t sprocket (ORIGIN), rip off all your shifters, gearing cables, derailleur etc... Get a chain tensioner that mounts up to your dropout, and you have a badass 29er singlespeed. Its the best thing I've ever done to a bike!

Anonymous said...

This bike + $150 in upgrades = the best value for a 29er anywhere.

MTBtx75 said...

i own one as well, the only problem i ran into was the stock rims, theyre trash. but other than that its a pretty good ride, like you said. its the riders skill, not the bike. :)

Anonymous said...

2 bunny hops and the front tire bent, garbage

drillerboy said...

You have to admire Mark's don't confuse me with the facts attitude. I am almost ashamed to add myself to the list of satisfied owners of this bike, and I own a lot of bikes.

I have reconciled myself to the fact that I do not own a REAL mountain bike, it helps that I live in Nebraska and the bike, like most will never see a REAL mountain.

I suppose the fact that actually own and ride this bike does not entitle me an expert opinion of as much value as Mark's but I still cling to it.

I have no problem with the promotion of the local bike shop, for most it is the best choice.

I do have a problem with the slamming of the quality of the bike. It is good.

The problem for the average owner, is it only comes partially assembled. It is deceiving because the parts are all more or less where they belong, but they are loose and/or out of adjustment. The wheels are good reasonably strong wheels, but if you ride it the way it comes, with loose, out of adjustment spokes, it is easily bent. Chances are it will not shift well unless you know how to adjust that. And so it goes with just about every part of the bike. Just don't try to tell me the components are crappy and won't hold up and all under typical use, because if they are properly adjusted that is not true. If you need a bike shop to accomplish that, OK. I do not.

Anonymous said...

I bought this bike from a friend, he paid over $220 about 2 months ago. He decided he didn't want a bike and sold it to me for $30. I absolutely love it. Any suggestions on upgrades that would make my riding experience even better? This thing will never see a mountain, maybe at worst a dirt path with some mud holes.

Mark Lurie said...

Anon 2:01 PM I think you bought the perfect bike for rail trails and bike paths. I wouldn't mind one myself as I have been saying all along.

Those of you who feel that it's OK to buy cheap and then ride the crap out of the bike, how long do you go before you are replacing something? If it's lasting a lot longer than one would think then perhaps you are not the rider that you want everyone to think you are because from what I can tell by peoples' posts if they are riding singletrack on this bike, and riding it hard, like mountain bikers should, then they are replacing parts.

You get what you pay for! Just Saying.

Anonymous said...

Ok. I Just can't find or see the difference between the impasse & deception I've looked on different forums n sites even went down to Walmart to look at a deception They had their the only difference on that deception was it lacked the rear disk breaking system & its the only deception ive seen like that but generally speaking they are the same. Can someone enlighten me?

Anonymous said...

I bought a used one today for 60 bucks and went on an easy trail straightaway. It rode ok. The gears didn't shift smooth. Its my first bike after 15 years. I guess its ok for destructive learning if it lasts me about 10 trails :-) I will be saving money for buying a decent bike for spring 2013.

Anonymous said...

This bike called a Mongoose Deception is using a Kent frame. A few years ago Mongoose contracted Kent to make the frame for the Deception. Kent also makes the exact same frame for bikes over 800 bucks. You can look up the Felt Nine Sporter. Same frame. What makes a bike great is the other components such as derailleur, shifter, brakes, and tires. Unless you live on your bike (most of you don't) you won't be able to tell the difference between this 200 dollar bike and an 800 dollar bike. Don't look at where it's sold, look at its components to determine if it's worth purchasing!!!

Mark Lurie said...

Anon, 5:34 PM. Frankly, if it ain't steel, it ain't real!